Wednesday, 24 October 2007

Desire Under the Elms

Jeremy Raison's latest production of Desire Under the Elms by Eugene O'Neill kicks off this weekend and runs until 17 November.

As a tantalising preview we have some exclusive photos direct from the rehearsal room. The cast are currently working on Jason Southgate's impressive two-story set on stage. O'Neill's passionate play is certainly causing sparks in rehearsals and we hope that you'll be able to join us for an evening of Desire!You can view more photos on our new Citz Flickr site.
Book tickets for Desire Under the Elms.

Hx

1 comment:

Edward Harkins said...

I was at the Friday 26th October performance and it was a first class introduction to the current vogue of Eugene O’Neil revivals.

The literal rendition of the depiction of the Cabot farmhouse on stage was superbly achieved in successive segments. But I won’t spoil it for prospective audience members by premature disclosure! Sufficient to say that there is an intriguing mix of lighting, minimal music and a little artifice to render it all complete. There was more than one scene where I thought “we’re no gonna see much of this” before all was fixed.

Robbie Towns was a convincing son Eban. A stubbly, rustic face with strong angular body and movements with the right element of youthful gangling. You just know from the start that he and his father’s young new wife are going to get it together. I could have done with him being just a tad more obviously devious in purchasing the other sons’ rights to the farm.

Iain Hogg’s father Ephraim was a powerful near-ogre portrayal where we, just about, might still feel a wish to sympathise with. But he was a fearful figure; he not to be satisfied by anyone, no-one to be satisfied by him.

The period setting was a telling example of ‘less is more’ – when Eban wonders about in his bedroom whilst the father's young wife ponders outside around the house, it's the first of two scenes where the erotic tension is palpable.

Lots more to say, but just for now I recommend this work to those who want to revisit O’Neil or seek a solid introduction.